Benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child

Home Forum Motherhood Benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child

This topic contains 5 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Precious Ozavize Precious 3 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2386

    1. A healthier baby
    “The incidences of pneumonia, colds and viruses are reduced among breastfed babies,” says infant-nutrition expert Ruth A. Lawrence, M.D., a professor of pediatrics and OB-GYN at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in Rochester, N.Y., and the author of Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession (Elsevier-Mosby). Gastrointestinal infections like diarrhea—which can be devastating, especially in developing countries—are also less common.

    2. Long-term protection, too
    Breastfeed your baby and you reduce his risk of developing chronic conditions, such as type I diabetes, celiac disease and Crohn’s disease.

    3. Stronger bones
    According to Lawrence, women who breastfeed have a lower risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis. “When a woman is pregnant and lactating, her body absorbs calcium much more efficiently,” she explains. “So while some bones, particularly those in the spine and hips, may be a bit less dense at weaning, six months later, they are more dense than before pregnancy.”

    4. Lower SIDS risk
    Breastfeeding lowers your baby’s risk of sudden infant death syndrome by about half.

    5. Fewer problems with weight
    It’s more likely that neither of you will become obese if you breastfeed him.

    6. A calorie incinerator
    You may have heard that nursing burns up to 500 calories a day. And that’s almost right. “Breast milk contains 20 calories per ounce,” Lawrence explains. “If you feed your baby 20 ounces a day, that’s 400 calories you’ve swept out of your body.”

    7. It’s good for the earth
    Dairy cows, which are raised in part to make infant formula, are a significant contributor to global warming: Their belching, manure and flatulence (really!) spew enormous amounts of methane, a harmful greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere.

    8. Better healing postdelivery
    The oxytocin released when your baby nurses helps your uterus contract, reducing postdelivery blood loss. Plus, breastfeeding will help your uterus return to its normal size more quickly—at about six weeks postpartum, compared with 10 weeks if you don’t breastfeed.

    9. Less risk of cancer
    Breastfeeding can decrease your baby’s risk of some childhood cancers. And you’ll have a lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer and ovarian cancer, an often deadly disease that’s on the rise.

    10. An unmatched feeling of power
    “It’s empowering as a new mother to see your baby grow and thrive on your breast milk alone,” Lawrence says.

    11. A custom-made supply
    Formula isn’t able to change its constitution, but your breast milk morphs to meet your baby’s changing needs. Colostrum—the “premilk” that comes in after you deliver—is chock-full of antibodies to protect your newborn baby. “It’s also higher in protein and lower in sugar than ‘full’ milk, so even a small amount can hold off your baby’s hunger,” says Heather Kelly, an international board-certified lactation consultant in New York City and a member of the Bravado Breastfeeding Information Council’s advisory board.

    When your full milk comes in (usually three to four days after delivery), it is higher in both sugar and volume than colostrum—again, just what your baby requires. “He needs a lot of calories and frequent feedings to fuel his rapid growth,” Kelly explains. “Your mature milk is designed to be digested quickly so he’ll eat often.”

    12. More effective vaccines
    Research shows that breastfed babies have a better antibody response to vaccines than formula-fed babies.

    13. A menstruation vacation
    Breastfeeding your baby around the clock—no bottles or formula— will delay ovulation, which means delayed menstruation. “Breastfeeding causes the release of prolactin, which keeps estrogen and progesterone at bay so ovulation isn’t triggered,” Kelly explains.

    “When your prolactin levels drop, those two hormones can kick back in, which means ovulation—and, hence, menstruation—occurs.”

    Even if you do breastfeed exclusively, your prolactin levels will eventually drop over the course of several months.

  • #2387

    It’s really healthier for the baby. But not all women have the opportunity to.

  • #2393

    Breastfeeding is the best feeding a mother can give to a child, it really says all about being a mother

  • #2394

    Breast feeding round the clock is not an easy task just the benefits out weighs the stress.

  • #2396

    Am sure every mother would love to do that but the time and resources requires might not be there.

  • #2399

    Thanks for sharing I really didn’t know about the Number 7part.really!!

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