Gestational diabetes

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Jimoh Kawthar oyindamola Kawthar_pearl 3 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2445

    Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby’s health.

    Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there’s good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy.

    In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes. You’ll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar.

    Symptoms

    For most women, gestational diabetes doesn’t cause noticeable signs or symptoms.

    When to see a doctor

    If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you’re pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby’s health.

    Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy.

    To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team will check your blood sugar right after delivery and again in six weeks. Once you’ve had gestational diabetes, it’s a good idea to have your blood sugar level tested regularly.

    The frequency of blood sugar tests will, in part, depend on your test results soon after you deliver your baby.

    Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic

    Causes

    Researchers don’t know why some women develop gestational diabetes. To understand how gestational diabetes occurs, it can help to understand how pregnancy affects your body’s glucose processing.

    Your body digests the food you eat to produce sugar (glucose) that enters your bloodstream. In response, your pancreas — a large gland behind your stomach — produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose move from your bloodstream into your body’s cells, where it’s used as energy.

    During pregnancy, the placenta, which connects your baby to your blood supply, produces high levels of various other hormones. Almost all of them impair the action of insulin in your cells, raising your blood sugar. Modest elevation of blood sugar after meals is normal during pregnancy.

    As your baby grows, the placenta produces more and more insulin-counteracting hormones. In gestational diabetes, the placental hormones provoke a rise in blood sugar to a level that can affect the growth and welfare of your baby. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy — sometimes as early as the 20th week, but generally not until later.

    Risk factors

    Any woman can develop gestational diabetes, but some women are at greater risk. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include:

    Age greater than 25. Women older than age 25 are more likely to develop gestational diabetes.

    Family or personal health history. Your risk of developing gestational diabetes increases if you have prediabetes — slightly elevated blood sugar that may be a precursor to type 2 diabetes — or if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. You’re also more likely to develop

  • #2446

    thanks for sharing

  • #2449

    Diabetes is very rampant now. It’s best to check your blood sugar

  • #2453

    Frankly, am so so afraid of diabetes of any kind.

  • #2459

    Does this means that this type of diabetes occurs only during pregnancy? And after pregnancy, can your body revert to normal?

    • #2477

      It occurs only during pregnancy but I don’t know if the body will get back. To normal  after delivery. But it threaten the lives of both mother and child

  • #2476

    wow.so gestational diabetes can also be hereditary.will it be gone after child birth?

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